The Childishness of Presuppositional Apologetics

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Don’t be mislead by the title. There is nothing childish about presuppositional apologetics. (It’s just a play on words.)

During a recent episode of the Apologetics.com podcast, on March 16, 2014, Chris Neiswonger interviewed Presuppositional Apologist, Sye Ten Bruggencate. Sye released a documentary with Crown Rights Media in 2013 called, “How to Answer the Fool”: A Presuppostional Defense of the Faith. (I highly recommend it.)

Presuppositional apologetics is a witnessing approach which shows that there are only two positions regarding reality: Christ. . .or absurdity. It’s a defense of the Christian faith from an epistemological perspective.

Towards the end of the interview, Sye explained to Chris that even kids get this apologetic approach. He gave an example from a story that Eric Hovind (Christian Apologist) had shared with him. Eric had shared with Sye that over breakfast one morning with his young daughter (the morning after he had been arguing with people who had denied knowledge), he had warned her that there are people out there who say that they cannot know anything. Eric’s daughter shockingly replied, “How do they know that?” Eric retorted, “Where were you at 2 in the morning?” LOL! Sye then explained to Chris that, “Kids get this, it’s that easy.”

At that moment while driving and listening, I paused the podcast and thought about putting this claim to the test. I decided to see if it was true. So, I pulled over to the side of the road, and I texted my 10 year old daughter, Emily.

The following exchange is exactly how it went down, verbatim, spelling errors and all. I texted her out of the blue:

Me: There are people in this world who think that you cannot know anything. What are your thoughts on this?

Emily: Idk

Me: What would you say to such a person?

Emily: ???

Emily: Um

Emily: Well I’ve been to school so I knoe stuff

Me: Ah

Me: So is that statement true?

Emily: Of course

Me: No no, is this statement true: Hey

Emily, I cannot know anything?

Emily: No it’s not true

Me: Very good why not?

Emily: Well ur asking me something so u know how to talk

Me: Wow excellent

Me: Okay here’s a tough one: How do we know anything?

Emily: Cuz God made us know something

Me: Wow excellent again you are nailing it

Me: Is it possible to know anything without God?

Emily: No

Me: Correct

Me: Why not?

Emily: Cuz he’s God

Me: Amen sweetheart

Me: Proverbs 1:7
The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge;
fools despise wisdom and instruction.

Emily: I know dat 1

Me: You are not a fool

Emily: I know

Me: How do you know?

Emily: Lol u just told me

Me: Tell me in your words

Emily: Cuz the bible says I’m not a fool

Me: Well some people are fools and some people are not fools why are you not a fool?

Emily: Cuz I’m a believer

Me: Amen sweetheart amen

Emily: ☺️

Sye is right. Kids get presuppositional apologetics. I urge you, brothers and sisters, to look into this apologetic, if you haven’t already. Again, I highly recommend that you get this documentary. It will change how you evangelize.

This is a trailer from the film:

Godspeed, to the brethren!

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5 thoughts on “The Childishness of Presuppositional Apologetics”

  1. Very helpful.
    I think of Psalm 8:2, “From the mouth of infants and nursing babes You have established [b]strength Because of Your adversaries, To make the enemy and the revengeful cease”

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